Use Fonts on iOS!

Now you can install H&Co fonts on your iPhone and iPad, and use them in applications that support fonts.

Great mobile apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote make it easier than ever to use your iPad and iPhone not just to consume content, but to create it. Typography, a long-missing piece of the puzzle, just got a lot better: starting today, your iOS 7 devices can use all the Hoefler & Co. fonts you’ve ever purchased, and you can install them directly from this site. Free.

Using Safari on your iPad or iPhone, head over to your Font Library page. You’ll see a list of fonts you’ve licensed for your computer, each with an add to device link that installs them directly into your mobile device. Managing fonts on iOS is easy — you’ll find more information about it in our FAQ. Enjoy!

Pages on the iPad, using Tungsten, Gotham, Sentinel, Surveyor, and Whitney.

Fonts by Hoefler & Co.

We’re marking the change from H&FJ to H&Co with some updates to our font library, some new features on the site, and some good news for app developers.

Improved mobile fonts

We’ve remastered all 1,094 fonts in our library to deliver even more consistent performance across desktop, web, and mobile environments. In the past, we’d supplied app developers with special “mobile” versions of fonts built for iOS and Android — but starting today, any fonts you purchase for your computer will be the same ones you’ll use when developing mobile apps.

Free updates for desktop fonts

We’re building a new feature for the site that makes it easy to download your past purchases any time you need them, and to ensure that you always have the latest versions of our fonts. Today we’re rolling this out to our Cloud.typography subscribers, and soon we’ll be making it available to everyone. If you’re a Cloud user, log in and go to Your Font Library under the “Welcome” menu, and you’ll be able to see your entire font collection, and download the latest versions of any fonts you’ve licensed for your computer.

Streamlined app development

We’ve changed our licenses to make life a little easier for app developers. In the past, developers needed two kinds of licenses: an End-User License to use fonts on their computers, and a separate App License to embed these fonts in their apps. We’ve rewritten our EULA so that anyone buying a computer license can now use these fonts to develop apps, without any separate paperwork. App Licenses are needed only when publishing an app, something our licensing group can help arrange for you or your clients.

Fly Delta, Readability, QuizUp and Threes, featuring our Whitney SSm, Sentinel SSm, Gotham SSm, and Premium typefaces.

We’d like to thank all the designers and developers who’ve made our typefaces a part of your fantastic work. As people who are obsessed with designing fonts to solve problems, we love seeing all the ways you’ve used our fonts to improve familiar experiences, and create entirely new ones. We can’t wait to see what’s coming next. —JH

The Tablet Magazine

Typefaces: Vitesse, Forza, Tungsten, and Gotham Rounded

Wired gets it. Today they’re going public with the prototype they shared with us a few weeks ago, and if you’re like me, your reaction will be an instantaneous “neat!” followed immediately by “well, isn’t it obvious it was supposed to work this way?” When something creates and fulfills expectations at the same time, you know you’ve got it right. —JH

Uptown App, for iPhones

Typefaces: Gotham, Mercury Text, Giant

Manhattan’s urban grid is a vaunted model of simplicity, a rectilinear plan of numbered streets intersecting numbered avenues. Never mind that West 4th Street crosses West 10th, that those walking from Fifth Avenue to Third Avenue will seldom encounter Fourth Avenue, and that “North” in the New York sense differs from conventional “North” to the tune of 29°. It’s this kind of accuracy, transparency and accountability that makes New York the perfect home for Wall Street.

A fixture of the corner of Broadway and Houston, where H&FJ makes its home, is a tourist population forever asking that question of the ages, “which way is uptown?” I can’t entirely blame them: in the math of the NYC grid, Houston is 0th Street, and local signs wickedly conceal the real names of avenues below fake labels that are designed specifically to ensnare tourists. (Watch the meter when you ask a taxi driver to take you anywhere on “Avenue of the Americas.”)

To the rescue comes our own Andy Clymer, whose joint interests in typography, programming, and human decency are combined in Uptown App, his new utility for the iPhone 3GS. Andy’s thoughtfully used some of our fonts on what’s actually a pretty handy app: because it uses the iPhone’s built-in magnetometer, it can give you a quick read on “uptown” in places where GPS signals and cellular networks are unavailable or slow to come online, like when stepping out of freezing cold subway stations. Compared to the inconvenience of frostbite, 99¢ is a genuine bargain. —JH

Your project exceeds the 1,000k limit, so your changes have not been saved.

Try adding fewer fonts, fewer styles, or configuring the fonts with fewer features.