Introducing Whitney Narrow

The Whitney typeface has always been an adroit multitasker. Having grown out of a commission from New York’s Whitney Museum, the typeface was designed to serve two masters: the museum’s publications department, which needed a design both compact and energetic, and the facility’s public signage, which above all required legibility and sturdiness. A later addition designed for headlines, the six-style Whitney Condensed family, made Whitney an even more valuable tool for both publishers and brands.

But one challenge that Whitney has never confronted is the narrow column. As editorial designers know, narrow columns are the bugbear of typography: they’re hostile to wide typefaces, perverting text with overzealous hyphenation, and often demanding that headlines be craftily written. Designers, developers, publishers, and brands now face the challenge of narrow columns every day in the form of the mobile phone: with the ascendancy of apps and the mobile web, fonts are routinely set on a two-inch measure. For these applications — as well as the narrow columns that permeate magazine sidebars and captions, paper packaging, data visualizations, and product literature — we’ve created the compact and economical Whitney Narrow®.

Whitney Narrow was designed to thrive at sizes both large and small. At small sizes, it excels not only in text and informational typography such as charts and graphs, but for rendering the growing universe of fine print that’s often required but infrequently read: the ingredient lists, nutritional information, regulatory notices, disclaimers, and copyright legends that attract compact typefaces. In print, Whitney Narrow renders this fine print with clarity and warmth. For the screen, we’ve created the companion Whitney Narrow ScreenSmart family, a collection of twelve screen-optimized typefaces that’s designed and engineered to perform at sizes as small as nine pixels.

At headline sizes, Whitney Narrow makes a hale companion to the regular-width Whitney. It preserves Whitney’s angular motif (originally inspired by the iconic geometry of Marcel Breuer’s Madison Avenue museum), and features an option to disable these details when they’re not wanted. Above, Whitney Narrow Bold in two different moods: jaunty with its angled stroke endings, and sober without them. These gestures appear in 231 different characters, but can be quieted with a single setting in any application that supports OpenType Stylistic Sets, such as Adobe InDesign, and the Cloud.typography webfont dashboard.

Introducing App.typography

Now you can use the H&Co fonts you love to publish apps, digital publications, eBooks, and more. Meet App.typography, the simple font licensing solution for digital publishers.

App developers lavish such care creating thoughtful, lovely experiences, places where users can return again and again, and always feel at home. For all the time we spend browsing the web, we’re spending more and more time using our devices’ native apps, a trend that’s poised to continue with the arrival of mobile-minded projects like Facebook Instant Articles and Apple News. The one thing that all mobile experiences have in common is type, making it more important than ever to get the type right — to use the right fonts to create the sophisticated, expressive environments that users deserve.

We’ve long worked with our clients to bring typography into the mobile space. For some, it means developing cross-channel typography that aligns their print, web, and mobile products; for others it means choosing fonts that solve problems, and help shape the user experience from the outset. We’ve found that the needs of designers, developers, publishers, news organizations, institutions and brands are all a little different, but what everyone wants is for type to be functional, and for licensing to be painless. We want these same things, and more: we want to furnish app developers with the same high-quality tools available to print and web designers. We want developers to have access to everything that a font family has to offer, to be free to match the font to the medium and the experience, and to be relieved of having to count styles, platforms, or downloads. In short, we want to do everything for app developers that Cloud.typography did for web developers, allowing people to use their existing H&Co libraries in a whole new way.

Meet App.typography.

App.typography is a service that enables you to publish apps, digital publications, or eBooks that incorporate any of the H&Co fonts you’ve bought for your computer. It’s a new model for licensing fonts, one that’s based not on the number of font styles that you choose to embed, but the number of titles that you publish.

For developers, App.typography means the freedom to choose from whichever fonts you’ve bought, including as many styles as necessary to create the perfect experience. We’ve defined “an app” in the broadest possible way, so that the product you create for iOS, Android, and Apple TV — even if the versions for the Apple Watch and the Samsung Galaxy Tab don’t share a single line of code — is covered by a single App.typography subscription.

For publishers, App.typography offers the ability to port your existing typography to digital publications and eBooks, to distribute these in a vast array of different formats, and to cover all of the books that you publish under a single imprint. Use as many fonts as you’ve purchased, to publish as many books as you like, and see them downloaded as many times as possible, all with a single App.typography subscription.

The Fonts

An App.typography subscription covers all the H&Co fonts you’ve purchased for your computer, and all the fonts that you buy in the future. This extends to the entire H&Co library of more than 1,300 styles, including our nineteen families of ScreenSmart fonts that are specially designed for the screen. You’ll find countless solutions for app design in the H&Co library: fonts with tabular figures for game scores and activity timers, compact fonts for narrow columns, and high-performance text faces for extended reading. Spend some time at Discover.typography if you’re looking for inspiration, or get started with App.typography today.

Use Fonts on iOS!

Now you can install H&Co fonts on your iPhone and iPad, and use them in applications that support fonts.

Great mobile apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote make it easier than ever to use your iPad and iPhone not just to consume content, but to create it. Typography, a long-missing piece of the puzzle, just got a lot better: starting today, your iOS 7 devices can use all the Hoefler & Co. fonts you’ve ever purchased, and you can install them directly from this site. Free.

Using Safari on your iPad or iPhone, head over to your Font Library page. You’ll see a list of fonts you’ve licensed for your computer, each with an add to device link that installs them directly into your mobile device. Managing fonts on iOS is easy — you’ll find more information about it in our FAQ. Enjoy!

Pages on the iPad, using Tungsten, Gotham, Sentinel, Surveyor, and Whitney.

Fonts by Hoefler & Co.

We’re marking the change to H&Co with some updates to our font library, some new features on the site, and some good news for app developers.

Improved mobile fonts

We’ve remastered all 1,094 fonts in our library to deliver even more consistent performance across desktop, web, and mobile environments. In the past, we’d supplied app developers with special “mobile” versions of fonts built for iOS and Android — but starting today, any fonts you purchase for your computer will be the same ones you’ll use when developing mobile apps.

Free updates for desktop fonts

We’re building a new feature for the site that makes it easy to download your past purchases any time you need them, and to ensure that you always have the latest versions of our fonts. Today we’re rolling this out to our Cloud.typography subscribers, and soon we’ll be making it available to everyone. If you’re a Cloud user, log in and go to Your Font Library under the “Welcome” menu, and you’ll be able to see your entire font collection, and download the latest versions of any fonts you’ve licensed for your computer.

Streamlined app development

We’ve changed our licenses to make life a little easier for app developers. In the past, developers needed two kinds of licenses: an End-User License to use fonts on their computers, and a separate App License to embed these fonts in their apps. We’ve rewritten our EULA so that anyone buying a computer license can now use these fonts to develop apps, without any separate paperwork. App Licenses are needed only when publishing an app, something our licensing group can help arrange for you or your clients.

Fly Delta, Readability, QuizUp and Threes, featuring our Whitney SSm, Sentinel SSm, Gotham SSm, and Premium typefaces.

We’d like to thank all the designers and developers who’ve made our typefaces a part of your fantastic work. As people who are obsessed with designing fonts to solve problems, we love seeing all the ways you’ve used our fonts to improve familiar experiences, and create entirely new ones. We can’t wait to see what’s coming next. —JH

The Tablet Magazine

Typefaces: Vitesse, Forza, Tungsten, and Gotham Rounded

Wired gets it. Today they’re going public with the prototype they shared with us a few weeks ago, and if you’re like me, your reaction will be an instantaneous “neat!” followed immediately by “well, isn’t it obvious it was supposed to work this way?” When something creates and fulfills expectations at the same time, you know you’ve got it right. —JH

Uptown App, for iPhones

Typefaces: Gotham, Mercury Text, Giant

Manhattan’s urban grid is a vaunted model of simplicity, a rectilinear plan of numbered streets intersecting numbered avenues. Never mind that West 4th Street crosses West 10th, that those walking from Fifth Avenue to Third Avenue will seldom encounter Fourth Avenue, and that “North” in the New York sense differs from conventional “North” to the tune of 29°. It’s this kind of accuracy, transparency and accountability that makes New York the perfect home for Wall Street.

A fixture of the corner of Broadway and Houston, where H&Co makes its home, is a tourist population forever asking that question of the ages, “which way is uptown?” I can’t entirely blame them: in the math of the NYC grid, Houston is 0th Street, and local signs wickedly conceal the real names of avenues below fake labels that are designed specifically to ensnare tourists. (Watch the meter when you ask a taxi driver to take you anywhere on “Avenue of the Americas.”)

To the rescue comes our own Andy Clymer, whose joint interests in typography, programming, and human decency are combined in Uptown App, his new utility for the iPhone 3GS. Andy’s thoughtfully used some of our fonts on what’s actually a pretty handy app: because it uses the iPhone’s built-in magnetometer, it can give you a quick read on “uptown” in places where GPS signals and cellular networks are unavailable or slow to come online, like when stepping out of freezing cold subway stations. Compared to the inconvenience of frostbite, 99¢ is a genuine bargain. —JH

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