The New Archer Heavyweights

We’ve seen designers choose Archer for everything from wedding invitations to movie titles. Archer has a natural affinity for book jackets and product packaging, and developers have made great use of Archer ScreenSmart on the web. And some of Archer’s most unexpected performances have been among its best, delivering brand identities for news outlets, department stores, and multinational banks. The more designers have done with Archer, the more they’ve wanted to do with it, and the more we’ve wondered what else might be possible. So eighteen months ago, we returned to the drawing board.

New Voices

Archer was designed to be charming, a delicate book face that never raises its voice. Increasingly, we’ve seen designers coaxing new moods out of Archer, tightly letterspacing its boldest weights to achieve a more boisterous tone. Seeing the potential for a more graphic Archer, we explored how heavy the fonts might go; the answer is a lot heavier. So today we’re introducing Archer Black, Extra Black, and Ultra, each in roman, italic, and small caps, pushing the Archer family to a total of eleven weights. These new styles offer a wealth of new voices: now the ever-polite Archer can be exuberant, adamant, jolly, rustic, solemn, sporty, and vibrant.

New Textures for Text

Archer has always performed in both text and display sizes, a tradition we’ve continued with today’s new styles. The new Archers are vivid at large sizes, and clear in text — and they’re outfitted with all the trimmings needed to articulate content. The new Archer 3 Pro contains small caps, tabular figures, fractions, and even numerical indices. And if you’ve been using Archer’s heavier weights for text, now you use these heaviest weights for emphasis: just as you’ve paired Archer Book and Bold, you can now pair Archer Bold and Ultra.

Fonts in Fiction

Typefaces occasionally escape into the wild, sometimes to find themselves in unfamiliar literary climes. No designer has ever read Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco without being startled by the arrival of a certain Mr. Garamond early in the story; even the most pedantic typographer can’t help but love this delicious scene in American Psycho, in which jousting arbitrageurs boast about their business cards, all of it in nonsense designerese. (The cardstock? “It’s Bone. The lettering is something called Silian Rail.”)

While type designers are accustomed to seeing their work appear in fictional settings — movie props, mostly, many of them anachronistic — there’s a special strangeness that comes from reading about one of your fonts in a work of fiction. Having just tucked into A Little Life, a novel by Hanya Yanagihara, H&Co’s Carleen Borsella shot bolt upright when she saw our Archer typeface namechecked on page ten. I can only imagine that the fictional Jasper, who’s “using Archer for everything,” even body text, is himself a graphic designer: those of us on the inside know that Archer is indeed a text face, one that’s fitted with all kinds of features designed with text in mind. We’ll have to keep an eye on Jasper, remembering what happened last time an H&Co typeface enjoyed a brief literary interlude. —JH

Typography Shared

Typefaces: Ziggurat, Archer, Gotham

Designers who use our fonts have been sharing their work on our Facebook page, much to the delight of both the designers at H&Co, and our followers online. Some recent lovelies, clockwise from top left: Christopher Simmons designed this cheerful festival poster using Ziggurat, Leviathan, and a little Hoefler Text; a corporate identity that uses Archer (and a clever emboss) by Mike Kasperski; Gotham in a terrific typographic abecedarium by Paul van Brunschot and his students; a lovely collection of journals by Jodi Storozenko, featuring Archer in a moment of quiet repose; and a bit of Gotham in Anna Farkas’ exhibition identity for The renaissance of letters. Feel free to share your own creations: more then 6,500 other designers are tuned in. —JH

ARCHER: a New Font from H&FJ.

We’re delighted to introduce Archer®, a new slab serif in forty styles. Sweet but not saccharine, earnest but not grave, Archer is designed to hit just the right notes of forthrightness, credibility, and charm. Romans and italics in eight weights each, including a delicate hairline for display work, and featuring small caps, fractions, tabular figures, and our Latin-X® character set for extended language support. Now shipping in OpenType, with prices starting at $149, plus special savings when you order two or more Archer packages.

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