New at Typography.com

We’re starting off the new month with some enhancements to site, and some good news for web developers. Here’s what’s happening.

Answers: Search and FAQ

We took the occasion of writing a new Webfont FAQ to polish up our site search tools: you’ll find both resources available here. In addition to some guided tours of topics like licensing and troubleshooting, you’ll find updated answers to questions about publishing apps, making PDFs, and more. Since the tool searches across the entire site, look for some colorful surprises, in case you just happen to be searching for poodle’s paws, lightning bolts, Tupac Shakur, Zipf’s Law, or any of the three places we mentioned Steve McQueen, which science can’t explain.

Larger Desktop Licenses

We’ve been delighted to see organizations of every size adopt Cloud.typography, from independent developers subscribing at $99 to high-traffic websites who measure visitors in the billions. In keeping with the range of webfont subscriptions we offer, today we’re expanding the range of desktop licenses that can be purchased online: starting today, you can license fonts online for as many as 250 computers. As always, our sales office is happy to assist organizations who need even bigger licenses. Drop us a line.

Webfont Domains

One of Cloud.typography’s highlights is that it lets you deliver webfonts to an unlimited number of domains. We’ve heard from designers who enable a single domain such as example.com that traffic to www.example.com is blocked, because the www hasn’t been explicitly included. Starting today, every time you add a domain, the www subdomain is automatically whitelisted, and vice versa: adding www.example.com whitelists example.com as well. If you’re grappling with an especially gruesome list of subdomains, you can use the asterisk as a wild card to authorize them all, by adding *.example.com. There’s more about this in the Cloud.typography User Guide.

We’re hiring!

The best news of all: we’re hiring! If you’re a front-end developer with strong UX instincts, a sharp eye for detail, and you live and breathe JavaScript, we want to hear from you. With Cloud.typography up and running, and the next generation of web applications in the works, it’s a great time to join a small and dedicated team of obsessives, and to build things for an audience who appreciates good design. This is a full-time position in our New York office, open to US citizens and others with authorization to work in the US. Tell your friends. —JH

Now Hiring: Web Developer & Programmer

So you love HTML5. You’re psyched that the IE9 beta looks so promising, because you’ve got enough IE6 war stories, though personally you’re rocking the latest Firefox nightly. Sometimes you can’t remember what life was like before jQuery, but in a pinch you’re prepared to roll your own library. (Which, let’s face it, makes you feel a little like MacGyver, and you like working with folks who notice.) And you’ve spent a lot of time noodling with @font-face. A lot. Is this you? Come and work among kindred spirits: H&FJ is looking for a full-time front-end developer to make a significant contribution to the ever-evolving typography.com. Position filled!

You can feel when things are built correctly, and can smell a kludge at fifty paces. You know how to run a test and assess its results, and how to shepherd your source-controlled code all the way from development to release. You’re someone who likes to reduce a problem down to a set of tasks, and you’re intimately familiar with the sense of accomplishment that comes from seeing all the parts come together. You write modular code because you hate doing the same thing twice, but you’re always up for doing something five different ways just to be sure. And your middle name is LAMP. If this is you, come join us as a full-time web programmer at Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Position filled!

Teens, Typography, and Tim Gunn

“Designers…”

I knew I wanted to work with type by the time I turned eleven. Back then, my curiosity about letter-making could only be satisfied in oblique and solitary ways, most of which involved borrowed sheets of Presstype, and goofing off with the family typewriter. The Mac couldn’t have come soon enough.

Young typophiles today have more outlets for their enthusiasm (you are here), but next Monday will gain rare access to the profession as well: National Design Week begins October 18, when the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum will inaugurate the festivities with its 2009 Teen Design Fair in New York. Teenagers with an interest in design are invited to learn about type design — as well as graphic design, fashion, industrial design, and architecture — by chatting one-on-one with dozens of practitioners, including me. And Project Runway host Tim Gunn emcees the event! —JH


Teen Design Fair
Monday, October 19, 4:00-6:30pm

The Times Center
242 West 41st Street
New York, NY 10018

Now Hiring

There are those designers in the world whose idea of design begins and ends with typography. I’m obviously one of them: before founding H&FJ, my graphic design portfolio included book covers with carefully worked lettering atop “illustration TK,” and editorial design in which main features were ignored in favor of type-rich pages like the table of contents, where I really got to flex my muscles.

If this sounds familiar, and you’re a graphic designer in the New York area seeking full-time employment, take a look at our careers page: we’re looking for a very special typomaniac graphic designer to join us. Position filled!—JH

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