Introducing App.typography

Now you can use the H&Co fonts you love to publish apps, digital publications, eBooks, and more. Meet App.typography, the simple font licensing solution for digital publishers.

App developers lavish such care creating thoughtful, lovely experiences, places where users can return again and again, and always feel at home. For all the time we spend browsing the web, we’re spending more and more time using our devices’ native apps, a trend that’s poised to continue with the arrival of mobile-minded projects like Facebook Instant Articles and Apple News. The one thing that all mobile experiences have in common is type, making it more important than ever to get the type right — to use the right fonts to create the sophisticated, expressive environments that users deserve.

We’ve long worked with our clients to bring typography into the mobile space. For some, it means developing cross-channel typography that aligns their print, web, and mobile products; for others it means choosing fonts that solve problems, and help shape the user experience from the outset. We’ve found that the needs of designers, developers, publishers, news organizations, institutions and brands are all a little different, but what everyone wants is for type to be functional, and for licensing to be painless. We want these same things, and more: we want to furnish app developers with the same high-quality tools available to print and web designers. We want developers to have access to everything that a font family has to offer, to be free to match the font to the medium and the experience, and to be relieved of having to count styles, platforms, or downloads. In short, we want to do everything for app developers that Cloud.typography did for web developers, allowing people to use their existing H&Co libraries in a whole new way.

Meet App.typography.

App.typography is a service that enables you to publish apps, digital publications, or eBooks that incorporate any of the H&Co fonts you’ve bought for your computer. It’s a new model for licensing fonts, one that’s based not on the number of font styles that you choose to embed, but the number of titles that you publish.

For developers, App.typography means the freedom to choose from whichever fonts you’ve bought, including as many styles as necessary to create the perfect experience. We’ve defined “an app” in the broadest possible way, so that the product you create for iOS, Android, and Apple TV — even if the versions for the Apple Watch and the Samsung Galaxy Tab don’t share a single line of code — is covered by a single App.typography subscription.

For publishers, App.typography offers the ability to port your existing typography to digital publications and eBooks, to distribute these in a vast array of different formats, and to cover all of the books that you publish under a single imprint. Use as many fonts as you’ve purchased, to publish as many books as you like, and see them downloaded as many times as possible, all with a single App.typography subscription.

The Fonts

An App.typography subscription covers all the H&Co fonts you’ve purchased for your computer, and all the fonts that you buy in the future. This extends to the entire H&Co library of more than 1,300 styles, including our nineteen families of ScreenSmart fonts that are specially designed for the screen. You’ll find countless solutions for app design in the H&Co library: fonts with tabular figures for game scores and activity timers, compact fonts for narrow columns, and high-performance text faces for extended reading. Spend some time at Discover.typography if you’re looking for inspiration, or get started with App.typography today.

An H&Co Type Tasting

Typefaces: Sentinel and Gotham

We keep a running tally of the interesting media in which we’ve seen our fonts used, from corrugated cardboard to topiary. The designers who choose our fonts often share their more startling experiments on our Facebook page, including more than a few typographic tattoos. But with the holiday season upon us, things have taken a decidedly gustatory turn.

Designer Luke Elliott kicked things off over Halloween with his Gotham jack-o-lantern, to our knowledge the first example of in-gourd typography featuring an H&Co design. An anonymous designer followed over Thanksgiving with a beautiful collection of Gotham cakes that revealed the challenge of inlining a sans serif, in fondant no less. The latest contribution to the genre came last night, with designer Zach Higgins tweeting his exploration of the Sentinel Light Italic lowercase z rendered in toast. We’re left to wonder if our graded faces, such as Mercury Text or Chronicle Text, might provide designers with micro-fine control to adjust the relationship between color and burn. Please help us with this important research and share your findings. —JH

Typography Shared

Typefaces: Ziggurat, Archer, Gotham

Designers who use our fonts have been sharing their work on our Facebook page, much to the delight of both the designers at H&Co, and our followers online. Some recent lovelies, clockwise from top left: Christopher Simmons designed this cheerful festival poster using Ziggurat, Leviathan, and a little Hoefler Text; a corporate identity that uses Archer (and a clever emboss) by Mike Kasperski; Gotham in a terrific typographic abecedarium by Paul van Brunschot and his students; a lovely collection of journals by Jodi Storozenko, featuring Archer in a moment of quiet repose; and a bit of Gotham in Anna Farkas’ exhibition identity for The renaissance of letters. Feel free to share your own creations: more then 6,500 other designers are tuned in. —JH

Made With H&Co

An optometrist’s business card, the packaging for a rubber band gun, a basketball court, a scented candle, the concrete signage markers for subtropical hiking trails: these are just a few of the marvelous projects for which designers have chosen fonts from Hoefler & Co. They’re sharing their work over on our Facebook photo page, where more than 3,000 fans are currently perusing the collection. If you’re a Facebook user and an type enthusiast, come by and share the typographic masterpieces that you’ve made with our fonts.

New on the blog this morning, the tag “Made with H&Co” marks some of the great things we’ve seen done with our work, which we’ve written about here on the blog. Hiding among the publications, identities, posters, illustrations, and presidential campaigns are a few unexpected delights, including one typeface bedecked with icicles, and another fashioned into a ten-foot topiary. This week promises two more typographic extravaganzas: a brilliant but unclassifiable magazine, and a roving cupcake purveyor. Stay tuned. —JH

Find us on Facebook

Yesterday, our 1,000th Facebook friend became a fan of H&Co. Won’t you join us?

Fellow typographers have joined us on Facebook to start conversations, share links of interest, and post photographs of things made with H&Co fonts. (Now showing: group member Rick Griffith’s typographic stencils made from Gotham, in which the scale isn’t immediately apparent; “it’s about eight feet long,” says Rick casually…) Bring your favorite work featuring H&Co fonts and share it with the class. —JH

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